Electronics Recycling Options for Mountain States Residents

For those residents of rural communities in Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, and New Mexico, finding a mountain electronics recycling center can be a challenge. If there is no recycling center close to your community, consider these tips for purchasing and recycling your electronics equipment including televisions, computers, cell phones, and gaming consoles.

Some agencies estimate that 72% of used, outdated electronics device are being stored somewhere in the home or office. Considering that the average household owns about 24 such devices, that’s a lot of unusable space being needlessly taken up. Now is the time to do something about it by taking them to a mountain electronics recycling facility.

Tips For Reducing E-Waste and Recycling

The key to reducing the amount of e-waste which needs disposal is to think about the life of the electronics products before buy. One way to do this is by buying equipment whose life can be extended through upgradable components.

Consider purchasing refurbished electronics equipment. It costs less, and it helps support business ventures which reuse parts such as a mountain electronics recycling center.

Especially for businesses, leasing electronics devices may be a better choice than an outright buy. At the end of your lease, the equipment gets refurbished and reused.

Try to find people or organizations who are able to use your unneeded electronics and donate them. Young children and senior citizens, in particular, may be able to use your outdated computer for simple things like playing games or checking Email. Sometimes it only takes the replacement of a component to get your used equipment to work nearly as well as new.

How To Dispose of Used Electronics

The first rule of thumb is to never dispose of used electronics equipment in a manner that make sures it will end up in a landfill. There are far too many dangerous chemicals and substances in any electronics device which can leach into the soil and release toxic fumes if it breaks open.

Check with the manufacturer or point of buy retailer where you bought the device. More and more manufacturers, such as Dell and Hewlett-Packard, are offering buy back or turn-in programs. Some charge a fee for this service and others need you pay shipping charges to return devices to their mountain electronics recycling or refurbishment facilities so check each company’s policy for the specifics of their program.

The best option, however, is to find a mountain electronics recycling center. These businesses either collect and transport the devices to a recycling facility or do so themselves. Recycling centers break down electronics equipment to extract the components, such as gold, silver, and copper. This is the best way to save our environment and support recycling facilities.